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Quotes to Write By – Day 27

Writing high fantasy is not for the hobbyist. It takes perseverance, cleverness, and lots of dedicated time.

I’m currently completing the second phase of world building for a high fantasy series that’s been haunting my waking and dreaming hours for quite some time. About three years actually. Adara Trosclair, for whom this blog is named after will make her appearance in the second book. I see main character in this first book clearly. She’s not like Adara, who is charismatic, sweet, and girly. Lethe, on the other hand, is bitter, snarky, resentful, and will most likely be an unlikable character. But that in no way means that readers will be unable to relate to her. Anyone who has lived on this earth may have acted like this guy:

grumpy

in some way, shape, or form. Even for a day. 🙂

But then again, maybe Lethe is more like this:

grumpy cat_people

And the entire idea behind this book — once a tiny seed — is now a mighty oak tree. Lol. Well, in my mind currently. For the past several days I’ve been working on my fantasy world’s distinct parts:

  • Continents
  • Characters
  • Religion
  • Ethnic groups
  • Jobs
  • Mythology
  • Language
  • Conflict

I also want my high fantasy idea to be fresh and to question and maybe even provide answers to current issues in the real world. Issues like racism, sexism, and bigotry.

tolkien quote

At first, I totally agreed with this quote from Tolkien. Fantasy is a great way to escape! However, escaping and being distracted is so easy and it’s not worth it. Yes, we all need a little break every now and then (that’s why I play video games and do Zumba Fitness), buuuuuuut, ignoring important issues in the world isn’t a solution to the world’s worldly ills (yes, yes, yes, I know I used the word world three times in that one sentence).

I’m considering whether or not the book would fit the Young Adult age group and if so, what kind of pitfalls must I avoid? For instance, is it okay for the two main characters to engage in sex? How violent and bloody should the sword and sorcery scenes be? And what about expletives? My husband and I are fans of Dragon Age and the rating for this RPG is “M” for mature audiences due to sex (your main character can ROMANCE other characters), violence (lots of blood — I mean LOTS), and other suggestive themes. And as I continue plotting away, do I consider my book having a dark tone like Dragon Age? HECK YA!

dragon age

Lots of blood slaughtering darkspawn, humans, dwarves, elves, and dragons!

I wouldn’t mind kids similar in age to my oldest son who will be seventeen soon reading this book. But younger than that? Wow. Just wow. Makes me feel uncomfortable.

dragon age_killthequeen

Lol. I just want Alistair. 🙂

As a child, I loved fairy tales and I also want to incorporate them into my high fantasy books. My favorites are the Twelve Dancing Princesses, Little Match Girl, and Rumpelstiltskin.

 

Regarding Tolkien’s quote, I agree more with the spotlighted quote of the day. I don’t need to escape. I want to understand.

 

Quote #27

Alexanderquote

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Why is Manchester an “Indie Author Hotspot” ?

manchester

Manchester, Town Hall (Commons Wikipedia)

I noticed the title of this article on another author’s news feed and I wondered why Manchester is an “Indie author hotspot”.

I considered the title could possibly be clickbait and ignored my curiosity.

 

 

But I don’t think that any longer. There must be some connection.

Why?

Because now Amazon.co.uk is launching a £20,000 cash prize for any author that publishes through the KDP platform between February 20th and May 19th of this year. And if Amazon is investing this kind of money, it’s not out of the kindness of its heart.

So, again why is Manchester such a lucrative utopia for Indie authors?

Really, why?

I did a little research and learned that Manchester, England has a LOT to offer to its citizens.

manchester_museum

Manchester Museum (Commons Wikipedia)

Museums and restaurants are boasted as second to none in the entire world. Other artistic hot spots like theaters thrive here. Likewise, it’s no surprise that artist of the written word would be successful in an area hungry for it and its artistic kin.

 

Another factor that sheds some light on why Manchester is an Indie hotspot is because of how Manchester’s universities are described as “world-class”. In other words, students from all over the world want to attend college there and strut away with degrees into successful money-making careers.

Typically, a society that has a high percentage of people who can read and enjoy reading will purchase books. This particular factor made me wonder if countries with the highest literacy rates would be an ideal hotspot for Indie authors as well. I haven’t researched that yet, but I plan on it.

A final factor is the cost of living.

cost of livingThe cost of living is the level of prices relating to a range of everyday items. In Manchester, the cost of living is decent and bares a positive correlation with people’s incomes. The cost of living is another reason why I think Indie authors are able to thrive and make a living as full-time authors.

Moreover, when you consider that there’s a connection between poverty and illiteracy it makes sense that people can’t buy books (reading would be seen as a  luxury) when they are worrying about food, shelter, and clothing. quote-literacy-could-be-the-ladder-out-of-poverty-morgan-freeman-62-28-24

What do you think of this recent trend in the self-publishing world? Where do you think the next hotspot will develop? Or maybe the location is just a coincidence?

Thoughts, comments, discussion are all welcome!! 🙂

 

 

 

Had I But Known . . . Or, You Wrote it, Now Sell It!

circular stair

According to Mr. Wikipedia, “‘Had I but known’ is a form of foreshadowing that hints at some looming disaster in which the main character laments his or her course of action that came before some other series of unfortunate events or actions and classically, the narrator never makes explicit the nature of the mistake until both the narrator and the reader have realized the consequence of the error. If done well, this literary device can add suspense or dramatic irony; if overdone, it invites comparison of the story to Victorian melodrama and sub-standard popular fiction.”

And if I had but known that Indie publishing that would lead me on a roller coaster ride of euphoria, despair, anxiety, and relief (in no particular order) I most likely wouldn’t have bothered.

Most likely and yet here I am! 🙂

Dark Night of the Soul

The phrase, “dark night of the soul” has evolved into meaning the difficulties of life. And writers often use it to describe the hard time they’re having writing. And Indie authors like myself use it to reflect the struggle we experience trying to be recognized on the same plane as traditionally published writers.

Indie Publishing isn’t for the faint of heart. It isn’t for the hobbyists that dabbles in writing and doesn’t care about gaining readers and making money off of their literary works. And that’s fine. But I’m a believer that doing what you love for a living is the best of both worlds.

As I research ways of becoming noticeable and gaining more clout, I noticed that financially successful authors provide lots of gimmicks that have worked for them and share these tips with less prosperous writers (sometimes for a price):

Free book giveaways

$0.99 Book deals

Blog Reviews

Dedication and Drive

And so many more bits of advice. To someone new to Indie publishing, like me, it is overwhelming. Especially when you have to juggle important factors — family, a spouse, and a full-time job — to name a few.

But even after implementing these strategies, some authors still can’t sell a single book. Or even break even with how much money they had invested in their work. For example, I’ve invested close to $2,000 in my career as an Indie author. The dollar amount includes:

  • Book covers (custom designed)
  • Editing and proofreading
  • Marketing (business cards, flyers, promotions)
  • Author website (hosting)
  • Paperback copies of book

Self-publishing isn’t free and it most certainly isn’t cheap.

Which brings me to an interesting statistic. As of 2016, close to 40 authors on Amazon  have sold over 1,000,000 ebooks. Yes, you read that correctly. FORTY!

crying

“NOOOO! It’s too horrible! Damn lies and statistics! Lies!”

40 self-published authors “make money”, all the others, and they number in the hundreds of thousands, don’t. This interesting statistic, recently revealed in a New York Times article, applies to the Kindle Store, but since Amazon is in fact the largest digital publishing platform in the world, it is a safe bet that self-published authors are not doing much better anywhere else. (from https://claudenougat.wordpress.com/2016/02/07/only-40-self-published-authors-are-a-success-says-amazon/)

With statistics like this, one could just throw up their hands and give up. Statistics like this are demoralizing.

On the other hand, when you read articles like this, the future of Indie publishing looks more promising than ever. According to the linked article, almost a decade ago, writers who self-published were viewed as failures. Fast-forward to present day and now many of these Indie authors are making a fortune. Whether these authors have earned a quarter of a million dollars or even $10,000 they’re making more money doing it alone than relying on gate-keeping publishers and their contracts.

$10,000! Wow, I’d be happy if I made even $1,000. So, I shall carry on.

For Art or Money? Or Both?

Let’s revisit the argument on why writers write. Is it less noble to expect payment as starving artist believe? I write for pleasure. I write to vent. I write because I’m compelled to. If I don’t write, I don’t feel right.

Likewise, once I’ve published a book – one of my literary creations – and place it for sale, I expect to get something in return. I expect recognition in some way, shape, or form for all of the time I invested into that book. Money, for example, is a primary indicator of success in many societies. So, my motivation is a little bit of both – art and money. Nothing wrong with that.

Cave of Obscurity

caves

Amazon is like a vast rain forest filled with merchandise that consumers go spelunking for. As an Indie author, braving the cyberspace landscape, (most likely on Amazon.com) you want exploring customers (potential readers) to discover YOU and quit clicking for something else. Unfortunately, rain forests, (like the actual geographical Amazonian rain forest) also possess caves where explorers can get lost. And on Amazon.com, you’re competing with other books that have more marketing clout and exposure than you do.

It doesn’t take long to realize that due to the residual stigma of self-publishing, most Indie authors are at a disadvantage.

Giant_Competition

David and Goliath? Little dude, use your briefcase!

Forget the so-called gatekeepers of publishing. Flesh-eating trolls who stalk the many cave tunnels are a much bigger threat.

And each year, the amount of titles increases, thus raising the likelihood that your precious literary baby will end up in the cave of obscurity – a place where no one will find it. Ever.

Heck, all the hours of writing, researching, building a platform, etc. don’t mean much if readers can’t find the culminating product of your effort, and read it, then share it.

As of 2016, over 4 million titles are available compared with 600,000 (amount of titles six years ago). The market is overly saturated with books. Notice I didn’t say “good books”, but books in general. Not all books are created equal. So, in order for readers to discover your book, you have to stand out in the crowd! For example, I published my first middle-grade fiction book on Amazon and Barnes & Noble. I wanted to have it available with as many distributors I could gain. I plan to add more distributors and vendors in the months to come. To test Barnes & Nobles’ search engines, I typed in the key words I had laboriously chosen so readers could find my book.

Not one of the words worked.

Even when I typed in my author name with the title, I couldn’t find the book. 😦

And even when I typed in the title of the book, the subtitle, and my author name: nothing! I learned from other authors who published with B&N that the search engine is setup “like that” and I wondered why. I contacted B&N and asked for an explanation. I was given a sprawling response that went in a hundred different directions, but not an answer to my question.

Perhaps, B&N wants to keep Indie authors like me in the cave of obscurity.

descent crawler

Wow. Just wow. You’r really gonna do me like that?

There’s a good argument for that conclusion. I had planned on doing a book signing at the B&N close to my home and now I’m not so sure I want to commit to that. Why? Because after speaking with the manager of an actual brick-and-mortar store, I learned that as an Indie author, you have to sell your books on consignment. In other words, you purchase the paperback copies, bring them to the store and then have B&N customers purchase the book with a cashier at the front of the store. And this is the part that pisses me off. It can take up to six months for B&N to pay you the 40% that they OWE YOU. Sometimes longer.

Time will tell whether or not I will work with them. Will I recommend publishing books to other authors with Barnes & Noble? At this time, based on what happened . . . most likely not.

You Gotta Be . . .

On another note, I recently read a book on free promotion after seeing it on Facebook. And when I learned the author was an Indie author like myself, I felt even more indebted to help the said author out! However, when I read the first page, disappointment seized me and I had to set the book aside. For the past two weeks, I return to the book occasionally to remind myself of what not to do. The book was published in 2011 and has not a single review. I feel bad for the writer because I think he/she (I won’t specify the gender) thinks the book was publishable. Even though, there were hundreds of grammar and spelling errors. Even sadder, I think he or she was so excited to even have a book published that he/she threw caution to the wind and clicked the published button as soon as possible. I’ve been there! Done that! But, due to the amount of competition, readers will pass your book by and move onto one they deem better and worth an investment of their time.

Number of Book Sales doesn’t = Talent

The amount of book sales doesn’t reflect how talented an author is. If book sales were an indicator then the strange phenomena of crappy books selling millions of copies wouldn’t occur or wonderful books only selling few or none.

Don’t Quit Your Day Job. Yet.

Writing is a poor man’s job where only a minority of writers are able to pursue their craft full-time and make a living from it. I laugh when my students ask me, “So, are you rich now?” after they learned I’ve published two books. The first book I had to republish because I lost my publisher when they went out of business. My students assume that every writer can be J.K. Rowling, a rags-to-riches single mother who created a $15 million dollar brand and has a net worth estimated to be less than $1 billion.

rollingrowling

I can only aspire to reach that status.

reach for the moon

I love writing and will most likely continue to do so. However, “had I but known” that the art of writing would change, I would have focused more on creating manga and graphic novels. So, I may have to change venues and write for television series, video games, Netflix, et cetera. You know, societies latest panacea for their social ills.

In the meantime, I’ll keep my day job and work, write, work, write, work.

Get some motivation by listening to the talented and beautiful, Des’ree’s song “You Gotta Be“.