Archive | September 2018

How To Write In Deep POV

K.M. Allan

As a writer who has spent the last few years drafting a four book YA series, I thought I’d gained a good grasp on how to write.

I’d ironed out the head hopping that embarrassingly featured way too much in my first drafts. I’d mastered ending each chapter with a cliffhanger. And I’d worked out writing from a multi-character point of view (POV) was my thing.

So earlier this year when I received another publisher rejection for book one, I realized maybe nailing just those things wasn’t all I had to do.

Knowing my submission draft needed work but not knowing what kind (thank you generic rejection letter that gave no feedback, you were so helpful!), I turned to my trusty team of talented beta readers.

Through their feedback, I learned my book was missing two important things.

1) A proper balance of showing and not telling.
2) Deep…

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Creating Fantasy Food

Lissa Dobbs, Author

Ginger Cakes

Food is a vital part of life. It’s a major component in social interaction. It’s expressive of culture. And, let’s face it, we have to eat to live.

The characters in fantasy worlds are no different. They have to eat, and what they eat depends on where they live, their economic status, their culture, their personal preferences, and what time of year it is. Just like in our world.

The easiest way to create fantasy foods is to take something from our world and change the name of the dish or some of the ingredients. Easy-peasy.

However, if you’re more adventurous, you can create recipes for your world. These can be anything from typical meals to holiday delights. Mix ingredients you’ve never considered and have fun with it. Some of the dishes will be awesomely yummy, while others might be…well…more appropriate for the demons.

This was one of the things…

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4 Signs You’re Using Outdated Marketing Techniques

How To Ebook

Relevancy is everything in today’s marketing landscape. Things move at lightning speed in the digital world, so what worked for your business last year may not be very effective anymore.

Failing to adapt to change and sticking to the status quo can bring certain death to a business. For example, Kodak was once a powerful brand that controlled 90% of the United States’ film market in the 1970s. However, they never adjusted their marketing message and relied on old strategies to keep them afloat. Kodak failed to realize that customer’s priorities change. Today, consumers are interested in the actual story of a business, in addition to their product. Kodak failed to adapt to the changing priorities and nearly had to shut its doors after it declared bankruptcy, giving a whole new meaning to the phrase “Having a Kodak moment.”

read more 4 Signs You’re…

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Amerika’s Sick Slaveowner Mentality Is Alive and Well

Moorbey'z Blog

A billboard of former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick in San Francisco’s Union Square. (Eric Risberg / AP)

The slave patrols live.

Just ask any of the people at Nike who answer the phones and are dealing with an avalanche of angry white callers throwing the N-word around and complaining about Nike treating Kaepernick with respect.  Trump, Pence, and billionaire Rupert Murdoch’s Fox News are ginning up even more racist hysteria on a near-daily basis.

But this doesn’t come out of thin air.  There’s a long history of whites trashing blacks when they protest the systems whites have put in place to keep them down.

Policing people of color, which our history teaches was a “government function” handled by the southern states back in the day, was actually a largely civilian effort, although it depended on the support and constant encouragement of political leaders within government.

So, too…

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Why We Need Clichés

A Writer's Path

by Elisabeth Wong

I write as the inspiration strikes. Inspiration strikes at random times of my life. Huh.

Oh, and yeah, you probably did read the title of this post correctly. I mean for it to be in writing mostly, but I can kind of see how this will apply to real life as well. (….I’m not sure if I was being sarcastic there, either.)

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Crossing genres: exploring the different aspects of fantasy fiction

Oooh. Even more information about liminal fantasy (more informative and less subjective) — fantastic! And not just that this genre, but so much more! I can’t wait to write my own experiences with the fantasy genre! Yay!

John Robin's Blog

Welcome to September! I’m taking a moment away from my morning writing routine to introduce our topic, and thought that while I do so, I’ll take some time to reflect more on this great fantasy genre I write in and appreciate, via a detailed research tour, the diversity that exists around the unique narratives I’ve explored.

This month, our contributors will be writing more about what it means to cross genres or explore other aspects of fantasy, so to kick it all off, let’s talk about fantasy and just what it is and what sets it apart from the other genres.

johnrobinwall34The broad 4-group distinction

The fantasy genre is set apart from other genres in that it includes elements of the fantastic that vary from our mundane world of everyday experience. It is often categorized broadly based on the principles established in Farah Mendlesohn’s Rhetorics of Fantasy, wherein classification is…

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Liminal Fantasy and the Stupid Heroine

Researching liminal fantasy genre. Not disappointed with this post. It’s entertaining, gritty, and brimming with snarky information. Fun, fun, fun!

Blonde RJ

“I have the ability to tell the future.  I don’t know why or how, but I have it.”

“And what are you doing with this ability?”

“Selling peaches at a roadside stand and going to your Podunk school where I have no friends.”

– Any liminal fantasy book anywhere

BEWARE: Spoilers abound

I really like liminal fantasy.  Truly.  It’s like the marriage of realistic, issue-driven drama that I write and read, with the fantasy that the rest of the world writes and reads.  It’s a win-win compromise for all parties.  Something for everyone.

The definition of “liminal fantasy” is that the fantastic element is part of the normal universe and, though they may not like its effects, everybody seems to just accept it.  When literary fiction (click for definition) does fantasy, it’s usually liminal.Common examples of this are the anime show Clannad: After Story.  It’s about as…

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